Mealtime at Kindergarten

Mealtime at Kindergarten

The Kindergarten Food Program for Sanveld Kindergarten

This project funds food supplies (e.g.: oatmeal, pap, lentils, bread, peanut butter), wood for a cooking fire, water storage containers and transportation costs for purchasing and delivering the food. CSNS will provide 2 meals daily, 5 days per week for 55 orphaned and vulnerable children. The kindergarten program operates from 8 am to 1 pm weekdays, supervised by a kindergarten teacher assisted by 3 volunteers.


 CSN Board Members, Chief Ita, Theresa, Helge with Drimiopsis men clearing the sanctuary land.

CSN Board Members, Chief Ita, Theresa, Helge with Drimiopsis men clearing the sanctuary land.

Building Project on Sanctuary Site

The Namibian government donated 4.5 hectares of land to CSN to build a sanctuary for the orphaned and vulnerable children of Drimiopsis. The first step in achieving this longer term vision is to drill a bore hole (well) on the site to provide water for the planned resource centre, residences for the orphaned and vulnerable children, a shelter for the soup kitchen, a garden and a permanent structure for the kindergarten which is presently housed in a temporary shelter.

At present, orphaned and vulnerable children in Drimiopsis are vulnerable to many forms of abuse and exploitation. When they become of school age, they do not stay in school because of hunger, lack of supervision, absence of support and shelter. With safe housing, a nurturing environment and educational support they can grow to become change agents for their community, rather than victims who repeat the cycle of desperation and hopelessness.


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Future Initiatives

When resources permit, CSNS will also fund the kindergarten educational program. We will supply the kindergarten with books, paper, drawing materials, chalk board, chalk and other aids for teaching basic English vocabulary, life skills and concepts such as numbers, colours, letters. The English taught to the children is essential to help them make the transition to primary school because the entire curriculum in Namibia is taught in English rather than their mother tongue.